Creativity Magazine

Snark As A Verb?

By Vickilane
Snark As A Verb?
It's happened again -- a writer in one of my classes uses snark as a verb  -- as in, "Oh, I'm sure you do," she snarked, and I cringe as if someone had run a fingernail down a blackboard.  

Merriam Webster says that snark (used as a noun to mean an irreverent sarcasm) first came into use (as a noun) in 1999. (Yes, I know about Lewis Carroll's "The Hunting of the Snark" and I'm not sure there's any connection.)

Snark As A Verb?
Spell check seems to acknowledge snarky but no other iterations of snark. Still, an online search reveals several examples of snark as a verb. 

I still hate it. I know, I know, English is a living, evolving language and I'm old enough to remember actual blackboards and chalk and am therefore probably more set in my grammatical preferences.   In my opinion, snark et al are still a bit slangy and not appropriate for all uses. Dialogue? Sure, go at it. Or if the voice the writer is cultivating is a slangy one, then fine. But, in general narration? 

Snark As A Verb?

What do you think? Do you use snark in speech or writing? Do you use it as a verb? (I won't judge, I promise.) I want to hear some other opinions.) By the way, I have a similar reaction to the use of husk as a verb meaning to speak in a husky tone. "Oh, Lord Errol," she husked, "my maidenhead is not for sale." (Though I did use it myself once -- but it was in a humorous/satiric /one might even say, snarky piece.)
Snark As A Verb?


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