Psychology Magazine

How "you" Makes Meaning.

By Deric Bownds @DericBownds
Orvell et al. do some experiments on our use of the generic “you” rather than the first-person pronoun “I.”
“You” is one of the most common words in the English language. Although it typically refers to the person addressed (“How are you?”), “you” is also used to make timeless statements about people in general (“You win some, you lose some.”). Here, we demonstrate that this ubiquitous but understudied linguistic device, known as “generic-you,” has important implications for how people derive meaning from experience. Across six experiments, we found that generic-you is used to express norms in both ordinary and emotional contexts and that producing generic-you when reflecting on negative experiences allows people to “normalize” their experience by extending it beyond the self. In this way, a simple linguistic device serves a powerful meaning-making function.

You Might Also Like :

Back to Featured Articles on Logo Paperblog

These articles might interest you :

Magazines