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Sapphic YA with Complicated Families

Posted on the 16 June 2021 by Lesbrary @lesbrary
Sapphic YA with Complicated Families

Here's a trope I didn't realize I loved in a YA novel: complicated families. Whether it's an unusual family configuration, strained parent relationships, or long-lost siblings, I love seeing queer stories that explore all the different ways biological families can look. I come from a very loving and supportive but also fairly complicated family, so this topic is close to my heart. So here are a few of my favorite YA books with complicated families!

There's a good chance you're already familiar with this one, because it was hugely popular when it came out! This is a story told in verse about two sisters: one in New York and one in the Dominican Republic. Yahaira lives in New York City with her mother and her father, and Camino only sees her father once a year, when he comes to visit the Dominican Republic-but they actually don't know about each other until their father dies.

This is a story about grief, but it's also about trying to navigate those family secrets as well as finding out more about their father after he died, when they don't have a chance to talk to him about it or understand why he kept those secrets.

This is a really beautiful story that deals with some pretty difficult subject matter. Camino, especially, is really struggling, and when her father dies, she doesn't have that same support and protection that she had before, and that leaves her vulnerable. One of the things I really appreciated about this book was the two main characters slowly starting to figure out who they might be to each other. We only see the beginning of this, but it stayed with me. This is a beautiful book about the complicated forms that family can take. (Yahaira has a girlfriend, so that's the queer content.)

You can read my full review here.

Sapphic YA with Complicated Families

This is one of my favorite YA books! It's a literal getting the band back together story with an F/F romance subplot-who can resist that? This follows three teenagers in the summer after they graduated from high school. They used to be best friends and in a band together, but a lot of events transpired at the same time that broke them apart.

When a battle of the bands is announced, though, they have to figure out how to come back together to hopefully win a ten thousand dollar prize, which would be life-changing money for them. What broke up their friend group is that one of the main characters was struggling with alcoholism and was hospitalized. At that same time, Dia's boyfriend died, and weeks later, she realizes she's pregnant. So she decides she can't stay in Hanna's life as long as Hanna is really self-destructing and drinking so much, especially now that she is pregnant. They don't talk to each other again until this summer that the story takes place.

What I really liked about this one is telling the story of Dia's teen pregnancy and being a young mom. I come from a family of young mothers, and it is very difficult to be a young mom, but I also really appreciate stories that show how complicated it is and how you can still have this beautiful family that comes out of it. It's a fairly small part of the plot, but it does show how Dia's family came together to help her raise this child.

You can read my full review here.

Sapphic YA with Complicated Families

This is a heart-wrenching story that is equal parts sweet romance of two girls falling in love and Grace's difficult relationship with her mother. Eva, Grace's love interest, has just lost her mom, and she finds comfort in conversations with Grace's mother, Maggie. Grace feels pulled in several directions: she's jealous that Maggie and Eva have a better relationship than Maggie and Grace, but she's also nervous for Eva. Maggie can seem like a gregarious, generous person, but she is unreliable. Grace is the one who has to rescue her from dangerous dive bar situations. She's the one who is pulled from house to house and Maggie moves in with short-term boyfriends.

Grace also feels like she's at a crossroads. She dreams of being a pianist and has a crucial audition coming up that would secure her a place at a prestigious school, but she's afraid of what would happen to her mother if she left her alone.

You can read my full review here.

Suzette and her brother Lionel used to be very close, but then Lionel started struggling with mental health issues and Suzette was sent away to boarding school. Suzette is bisexual and their family is Black and Jewish, so we see how those intersectionalities play out in Suzette's life, especially when she was at boarding school, where she had a bad experience and was outed outed.

The focus of this story, though, is Suzette and Lionel trying to repair their relationship. There's this gulf between them of that missing time-how they were both struggling when they weren't in each other's lives-and they're having trouble getting back to where they were before. Some of the descriptions of this book talk about the love triangle where they are both interested in the same girl, but it isn't really about that, and it's not some sort of competitive love triangle. It's much more about this sibling relationship and their complicated family, where they clearly both care a lot about each other, but are having trouble talking to each other about what's happened, what's changed in their family, and about how they can form a new relationship with each other.

You can read my full review here.

I couldn't help but talk about one of my favorite books, The Miseducation of Cameron Post. This book starts with Cameron having her first kiss with a girl and at that same time, far from the ferris wheel she's riding, her parents die in a tragic audience. When Cam finds out, those two things become connected in her mind. She is sent to live with her very conservative aunt, and she ends up being sent to a conversion camp.

This is a really difficult read in times, but it is beautifully written. I love Cam Post as a character, there's a bunch of great funny moments, and the side characters are really strong. The complicated family is mostly Cameron trying to reconcile with her grief and with her feelings about her parents, who she never got to come out to, so she doesn't really get closure. She feels this misplaced guilt that somehow this was a punishment for her kissing a girl, and that's why her parents died. It's about her learning to accept her whole self and trying to deal with her grief without punishing herself. This is my favorite YA book of all time. It's brilliant.

You can read my full review here.

This is a beautiful historical YA novels set in the 1920s in the U.S. It's about Garnet, who loves birds, but she can only express her interest in ornithology by cutting intricate silhouettes of birds; that's the "ladylike" way that she can pursue her interests. Her mother really needs for her to get married to support them, because they don't really have any other options. Meanwhile, Garnet falls for a flapper girl.

What makes this complicated, and I think what is the strength of the book, is that it discusses what we owe to each other and to our family: the difficulty and complexity of balancing your own individual needs and wants with the people who might be dependent on you. In most queer YA books, you get to come out and live your authentic self, and if your family is not supportive, you walk away from them. But for Garnet, she knows if she walks away from her mother, she has almost no way to support herself. Her mother would be fairly helpless living as an older single woman in 1920s America with no money and no backup. Silhouette of a Sparrow grapples with those really difficult questions about family and individuality.

You can read my full review here.

What I really liked about this book is that it has two main characters who are both Bengali Irish teenagers, but they're very different from each other: they have very different families, they speak different languages, they have different religions. They are both queer, but one of them is out as bisexual to her family, who is extremely accepting, and the other character has a family where she can't really safely come out.

I think that in modern queer YA, we don't see many families where you just don't come out-because it's not a good idea or because you don't feel safe doing it. And I think it's important to have that representation. I especially liked that because we had these two families, we saw that it wasn't just because they were a Bengali family, that there are Bengali families who would be very accepting and others that wouldn't be. The comparison between those two families that made it such an interesting book to read with that lens.

Another complicated family component to this is that Ishu has spent her life being fiercely competitive with her older sister. She's even competing to be head girl (that's how she got into this fake dating mess) to try to one-up her sister. But they begin to have a different dynamic with some distance, and a subplot of this story is them rebuilding their relationship as something more supportive.

You can read my full review here.

Sapphic YA with Complicated Families

This is about Nora, who was raised by her con artist mother. She had to participate in a lot of cons and become different people in all of them. Obviously, that is already a very complicated family. She no longer has much contract with her mother, and she's living with her older sister who helped her get out that dangerous situation. They are trying to leave that life behind them, but Nora ends up being caught up in a bank robbery and held hostage with her girlfriend and her ex-boyfriend.

This is an incredible thriller: it's so fast-paced. Definitely check out the trigger warnings, though, because it is also one of the most brutal books I have read. It is incredibly effective, and for the purposes of this list, it really shows how difficult it is for Nora to have grown up with this mother, who did not provide a safe and loving environment for her, but who also helped inform so much of who she is, and Nora trying to detangle those. If you are okay with really difficult subject matter, including rape, murder, and gore, and if you want to read a thriller about misogyny, I highly recommend this one.

You can read my full review here.

This is the book that inspired this post! It's YA novel about two sisters who are trying to stay out of foster care while their mother is in rehab, and it It also has a gender questioning main character.

Not only do Eli and Anna have a difficult relationship with their mother-Eli always accepts their mother's apologies after she comes home from the drunk tank, while Anna storms to her bedroom and slams the door-they also have a complicated relationship to each other. They used to be very close, but there's been distance between them ever since Anna threw out all her soccer gear one night and started dressed in black with no explanation. Now, while their mother is in rehab, they have only each other. And if they're going to avoid getting split up by foster care, they'll have to be persistent. (Anna dresses up as their aunt and goes to Eli's parent teacher conferences.)

Quickly, though, their plans fall apart, and in the scramble and impromptu road trip that results, they'll learn their family is even more complicated than they imagined.

You can read my full review here.

This post was originally a video sponsored by Middletown! If you want to hear me talk about these books instead of reading it, I've included the original video.


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