Gardening Magazine

Plant of the Week: Eryngium Paniculatum

By Davis Landscape Architecture @DavisLandArch

Eryngium paniculatum Flower (30/6/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Eryngium paniculatum Flower (30/6/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Position: Full sun to light shade

Flowering period: Summer

Soil: Moist, well drained

Eventual Height: 2m

Eventual Spread: 50cm

Hardiness: 6b – 10a

Family: Apiaceae

Eryngium paniculatum is an evergreen, rosette forming herbaceous perennial with tall erect flowering stems. Its mid green leaves are strap shaped with spiny margins, up to 30cm long and 3cm broad and arranged in a rosette. Its flowering stems are green and erect, branching towards the top. Its white green flowers are spherical, are up to 3cm across and appear in branched racemose inflorescence. The flower heads are followed by numerous viable seeds. Its roots are rhizomes.

Eryngium paniculatum Leaf (30/6/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Eryngium paniculatum Leaf (30/6/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Eryngium paniculatum, commonly known as Chupalla, Caraguatá or Cadilla, is native to Chile and Argentina. The roots of this plant may survive fire, enabling it to regenerate following this event. This plant is noted for being aggressive in its native habitat and livestock grazing pastures.

The etymological root of the binomial name Eryngium is derived from the Greek hruggion, a name given by Theophrastus for ”a spiny leaved plant’. Paniculatum is derived from the Latin means ‘having branched racemose or cymose inflorescence’

Eryngium paniculatum Flower Stems (30/6/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

Eryngium paniculatum Flower Stems (30/6/2012, Kew Gardens, London)

The landscape architect may find  Eryngium paniculatum useful as part of a prairie style planting scheme. Once establishedd this plant is drought tolerant for short periods.

Ecologically, E. paniculatum is attractive to pollinating insects.

E. paniculatum prefers moist, fertile, well-drained soils. It tolerates most pH of soil.

Eryngium paniculatum requires little maintenance. Self seeded seedlings may need to be removed.


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