Lifestyle Magazine

Japanese Self-Studying Updates (Lessons #30 and 31)

By Vanessa Kay @blushinggeek

Konnichiwa minna-san!

Happy Monday everyone! I hope you were all able to enjoy your weekend, I sure did mine, *smile. It’s Monday so it means it’s time again for another update, yey! Also, I’ve reached lesson 30 already so I figured I go change the graphics, and tadaah!

So last week, I learn about the TARI form which is about listing things you did or will do without any regards of their order, and aside from that, I also learn about forbidding someone into doing something. And for this week’s lessons, I am learning about connecting verbs in order (which is the opposite of the TARI form) and connecting adjectives then connecting them with verbs as well.

And again, this is not an attempt to create a tutorial but just sharing what I’ve learn from Misa-sensei’s Grammar Lessons for Absolute Beginners in Youtube. You can see what I’ve been learning from Lessons 1-29 here.

Click on the lesson number to read the whole update.

LESSON 30: Connecting Verbs (TE Form Sequence)

The TARI form (from lesson #28) is most suited for listing verbs or actions without being mindful of their order. But when you are telling a group of actions/activities in order, you use the TE form.
Ex: Honya ni itte
can mean:
  • Go to a book store <request>
  • Go/went to a book store AND THEN

I went to a book store and (then) bought lots of manga
=> Honya ni itte, takusan manga ( wo) katta <informal>
=> Honya ni itte, takusan manga wo kaimashita <formal>

Just like the TARI form, you can change the tense of the whole sentence by conjugating the last verb.

Ex: I will go the library and (then) read books
=>Toshokan ni itte, hon (wo) yomu <informal>
=> Toshokan ni itte, hon wo yomimasu <formal>

TE form:

  • Is used for request
  • And also use to describe the sequence of the actions performed or will be perform

So when the TE form is used at the end of the sentence, it means it’s a request. But if it’s placed in the middle, it’s probably in a sequence.

Also, to particle can only be used to connect two nouns.
Ex: women and men
=> Onna no hito to otoko no hito

Tomorrow, I’ll study Japanese and (then) work
=> Ashita, nihongo (wo) benkyou shite, shigoto suru <informal>
=> Ashita, nihongo wo benkyou shite, shigoto shimasu <formal>

ichinichijuu => all day
Yesterday, I woke up at 6 and (then) studied Japanese all day
=> Kinou, rokuji ni okite, ichinichijuu nihongo (wo) benkyou shita <informal>
=> Kinou, rokuji ni okite, ichinichijuu nihongo wo benkyou shimashita <formal>

megaku => to brush
shawaa wo abiru => to take a shower
I woke up, ate breakfast, brushed my teeth, took a shower and went to work
=> Okite, asagohan (wo) tabete, ha( wo) megaite, shawaa (wo) abite, shigoto ni itta <informal>
=> Okite, asagohan wo tabete, ha wo megaite, shawaa wo abite, shigot ni ikimashita <formal>

han => half past
I wake up at 7, go to work at 8:30, eat lunch at 12, go home at 5, eat dinner at 7 and go to bed at 11
=> Shichiji ni okite, hachiji han ni shigoto ni itte, juuniji ni hirugohan (w)o tabete, goji (uchi ni) kaette, shichiji ni bangohan (wo) tabete, juuichiji ni neru <informal>
=> Shichiji ni okite, hachiji han ni shigoto ni itte, juuniji ni hirugohan wo tabete, goji (uchi ni) kaette, shichiji ni bangohan wo tabete, juuichiji ni nemasu <formal>

You can also use it with TAI form (want to form)

Ex: I want to go to Japan and then eat sushi
=> Nihon ni itte, sushi (ga) tabetai <informal>
=> Nihon ni itte, sushi ga tabetai desu <formal>

It’s a bit advance, but you can also say:

I want to go to Japan and (then) do~, do~, do~ etc.
=> Nihon ni itte, ~tari, ~tari, ~tari shitai (desu)
Ex: I want to go to Japan and (then) eat sushi, take pictures, climb Mt. Fuji (and other stuff)
=> Nihon ni itte, sushi (wo) tabetari, shashin (wo) tottari, fuji san ni nobottari shitai <informal>
=> Nihon ni itte, sushi wo tabetari, shashin wo tottari, fuji san ni nobottari shitai desu <formal>

tetsudau => to help (with ~)
tasukeru => to save or help (someone)
I will find time and then help
=> Jikan (wo) mitsukete, tetsudau <informal>
=> Jikan (wo) mitsukete, tetsudau yo <more informal>
=> Jikan wo mitsukete, tetsudaimasu <formal>

yo particle is used:

  • To suggest
  • To give advice
  • To get the listener’s attention
  • When offering help to someone

Another advance example:

isshoni => together
Can I go to my friend’s place and study together (with him or her)?
<go ~ in the TE form>, <study together in “Can I” form>
(combination of the TE form <sequence> and the “Can I” form <permission>)

Can I go to my friend’s place and study together (with him or her)?
=> Tomodachi no uchi ni itte, isshoni benkyou shitemo ii? <informal>
=> Tomodachi no uchi ni itte, isshoni benkyou shitemo ii desu ka? <formal>

New vocabularies learned from this lesson:

  • onna no hito => women
  • otoko no hito => men
  • ichinichijuu => all day
  • megaku => to brush
  • shawaa wo abiru => to take a shower
  • han => half past
  • tetsudau => to help (with ~)
  • tasukeru => to save or help (someone)
  • isshoni => together

LESSON 31: Connecting Adjectives

shoppingumooru => shopping mall
shoppingusentaa => shopping center
nagai => long
This movie is long and boring
=> Kono eiga (wa) nagakute, tsumaranai <informal>
=> Kono eiga wa nagakute, tsumaranai desu <formal>
(nagai => nagakute = long AND)

Connecting Adjective

  • i-adjective: change the last i into kute
    Ex: kawaii => kawaikute
  • na-adjective: change the last na into de
    Ex: kireina => kireide

Dogs are cute and smart
=> Inu (wa) kawaikute, atama (ga) ii <informal>
=>Inu wa kawaikute, atama ga ii desu <formal>
fuwafuwa shite(i)ru (shiteimasu) => fluffy

  • (lit. doing/being fluffy)
  • it’s not exactly an adjective in Japanese

fuwafuwa => fluffy <onomatopoeia>
birobiro => wet / soaked <onomatopoeia>
betabeta => sticky <onomatopoeia>

To use these onomatopoeia words as a verb (adjective):

  • just add shite(i)ru or shiteimasu
    Ex: sticky
    => betabeta
    being sticky
    => betabeta shite(i)ru / betabeta shiteimasu

My cat is small and fluffy
=> Watashi no neku (wa) chiisakute, fuwafuwa shite(i)ru <informal>
=> Watashi no neku wa chiisakute, fuwafuwa shiteimasu <formal>

You can also connects verbs and adjectives

My cat is small, fluffy, and cute
=> Watashi no neku (wa) chiisakute, fuwafuwa shiteite, kawaii <informal>
=> Watashi no neku wa chiisakute, fuwafuwa shiteite, kawaii desu <formal>
shiteite => continuative form (to be doing)

Apartments in Tokyo, you can say:
=> Toukyou de apaato wa
or, the most natural:
=> Toukyou no apaato wa
(lit. Tokyo’s apartment)
Apartments in Tokyo are small and expensive
=> Toukyou no apaato (wa) chiisakute, takai <informal>
=> Toukyou no apaato wa chiisakute, takai desu <formal>

atsui => thick (flat objects)
Ex: meat is thick
=> Oniku wa atsui desu
Steak is thick
=> Suteeki wa atsui desu
futoi => thick or fat (round or cylindrical objects)
Ex: thick pen
=> futoi pen
thick / big legs
=> futoi ashi
My hair  is thick
=> Kami ga futoi
omoi
=> heavy

This book is thick and heavy
=> Kono hon (wo) atsukute, omoi <informal>
=> Kono hon wo atsukute, omoi desu <formal>

kibishii => strict
My teacher is scary and strict
=> (Watashi no) sensei (wa) kowakute, kibishii <informal>
=> (Watashi no) sensei wa kowakute, kibishii desu <formal>
ijiwaruna => mean <na-adjective>
My teacher is scary, strict and mean
=> (Watashi no) sensei (wa) kowakute, kibishikute, ijiwaru <informal>
=> (Watashi no) sensei wa kowakute, kibishikute, ijiwaru desu <formal>
My teacher is mean, scary and strict
=> (Watashi no) sensei (wa) ijiwarude, kowakute, kibishii <informal>
=> (Watashi no) sensei wa ijiwarude, kowakute, kibishii desu <formal>

Italian (as in person) teacher
=> Itaria jin no sensei
Italian (as in language) teacher
=> Itaria go no sensei
My Italian (as in language) teacher is beautiful, funny and kind
=> (Watashi no) itaria go no sensei (wa) kireide, omoshirokute, yasashii <informal>
=> (Watashi no) itaria go no sensei wa kireide, omoshirokute, yasashii desu <formal>

The teacher was funny and beautiful
=> Sensei (wa) omoshirokute, kirei data <informal>
=> Sensei wa omoshirokute, kirei deshita <formal>
This movie was long and boring
=> Kono eiga (wa) nagakute, tsumaranakatta <informal>
=> Kono eiga wa nagakute, tsumaranakatta desu <formal>

To change the tense of the whole sentence, you just conjugate the last adjective. Just refer to lessons 4, 5 and 6 to learn more about Japanese adjectives.

This movie was long and was not interesting
=> Kono eiga (wa) nagakute, omoshirokunakatta <informal>
=> Kono eiga wa nagakute, omoshirokunakatta desu <formal>
The library is quiet and clean
=> Toshokan (wa) shizukade, kirei <informal>
=> Toshokan wa shizukade, kirei desu <formal>

haiyuu => actor
joyuu => actress
That actor is tall and handsome
=> Ano haiyuu (wa) se (ga) takakute, kakkoii <informal>
=> Ano haiyuu wa se ga takakute, kakkoii desu <formal>
jouzuna => to be good at ~ <na-adjective>

  • format (to be good at ~ => ~ ga jouzu)

engi => acting
That actor is tall, handsome and good at acting
=> Ano haiyuu (wa) se (ga) takakute, kakkoyokute, engi ga jouzu <informal>
=> Ano haiyuu wa se ga takakute, kakkoyokute, engi ga jouzu desu <formal>

The doctor is smart and kind
=> Isha (wa) atama (ga) yokute, yasashii <informal>
=> Isha wa atama ga yokute, yasashii desu <formal>
(it’s general, so it literally means, all doctors are smart and kind)

When they are talking to doctors, they address them as sensei.
Ex: doctor Suzuki
=> Suzuki sensei

Doctor Suzuki is smart and kind
=> Suzuki sensei (wa) atama (ga) yokute, yasashii <informal>
=> Suzuki sensei wa atama ga yokute, yasashii desu <formal>

warui => bad
atama ga warui => stupid
Wario is stupid and mean
=> Wario (wa) atama (ga) warukute, ijiwaru <informal>
=> Wario wa atama ga warukute, ijiwaru desu <formal>
For stupid, you can also use bakana, which is a na-adjective
=> Wario (wa) bakade, ijiwaru <informal>
=> Wario wa bakade, ijiwaru desu <formal>

okane mochi => rich person <noun>

  • comes from: okane => money and motsu => to hold

Mario is strong and rich
=> Mario (wa) tsuyokute, okane mocha <informal>
=> Mario wa tsuyokute, okane mocha desu <formal>

kurai => dark
It’s cold and dark outside
=> Soto (wa) samukute, kurai <informal>
=> Soto wa samukute, kurai desu <formal>

New vocabularies learned from this lesson:

  • shoppingumooru => shopping mall
  • shoppingusentaa => shopping center
  • nagai => long
  • fuwafuwa => fluffy <onomatopoeia>
  • birobiro => wet / soaked <onomatopoeia>
  • betabeta => sticky <onomatopoeia>
  • shiteite => continuative form (to be doing)
  • atsui => thick (flat objects)
  • suteeki => steak
  • ashi => legs
  • omoi => heavy
  • kibishii => strict
  • ijiwaruna => mean <na-adjective>
  • itaria => Italy
  • haiyuu => actor
  • joyuu => actress
  • engi => acting
  • jouzuna => to be good at ~ <na-adjective>
  • warui => bad
  • atama ga warui => stupid
  • kurai => dark

So that’s pretty much what’s covered for this week. I’m still currently studying these lessons though but I’m already excited to see what’s going to be the next lessons are next week, *wink.

For the earlier lessons, you can refer to my previous updates for lessons 1-29. And again, if you want to study Japanese language as well, I am highly recommending Misa-sensei’s youtube tutorial for Japanese Grammar Lessons for Absolute BeginnersJaa mata ne!

Japanese Self-Studying Updates (Lessons #30 and 31)

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