Society Magazine

BOOK REVIEW: When the Sparrow Falls by Neil Sharpson

By Berniegourley @berniegourley

When the Sparrow Falls by Neil Sharpson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Amazon.in Page
Out: July 8, 2021 [June 29, 2021 some places.]
The Caspian Republic is a Soviet-style dystopia, but set in a future in which it is the sole holdout against rule by Artificial Intelligence (AI,) against virtual living, and against downloading one's consciousness. When, Nikolai South, an unimpressive agent of the State Security agency is given the seemingly undemanding, yet diplomatically sensitive, job of escorting the foreign widow of a deceased "journalist," something is amiss. Nikolai's work philosophy has been to find the sweet spot where he is neither noticed as a shirker nor for his excellence, and his mastery of this Goldilocks Zone has made him nearly invisible to upper management - or so he thought. What makes the job tricky is that the journalist, a man who wrote rants against AI and downloading of consciousness, turns out to be a downloaded consciousness, as is his wife, making her visit a little like the head of the Dalai Lama Fan Club being invited to Beijing.

I found this story compelling. The book perspective jumps toward the end (throughout most of the book, it's first-person narrated,) but for the most part the perspective shifts aren't problematic. While this shift away from first person narration isn't hard to follow, I would say this section goes on longer than I would have preferred. There is a point about two-thirds of the way through at which we lose the the thread of Nikolai, and at that point the story becomes largely a history of a fictional country (which, sans a central character, is a bit tedious,) but then the book resumes a character-centric story to the book's end (and I resumed enjoying it.)

If you're interested in books that make you question what being human means, and where the boundaries lie, you'll find this book intriguing and worth reading.

View all my reviews


Back to Featured Articles on Logo Paperblog

Magazines