Religion Magazine

Attending to Our Souls

By Marilyngardner5 @marilyngard
Attending to Our Souls

A couple of years ago, over Christmas, we dog-sat an unusual Greyhound named Pickles. Pickles was a large and awkward canine. He stood taller than our coffee table and took up a great deal of real estate in whatever room he occupied. Connor and his girlfriend at the time had planned on exchanging gifts at our house, in our living room. They sat on the floor and gave each other their presents. Pickles oddly enough felt the need to stand right between them. For those of us looking on there was no way to see the other side. The dog was in the way. Connor and his sweet friend bent down a little lower to see through Pickle's legs. Our youngest daughter peered around the dog's back end. Necks were craned, bodies tilted. Eventually with amusement, Lowell told Pickles to go lay down and Pickles regretfully and unwillingly complied.

In English, we have this expression, "the elephant in the room." Google explains it as, "a major problem or controversial issue that is obviously present but avoided as a subject for discussion because it is more comfortable to do so." Cambridge Dictionary defines it this way, "an obvious problem or difficult situation that people do not want to talk about." Clearly, here in the United States, we have now an entire herd of elephants stomping and snorting, pacing and pooping in nearly every room we enter. The large, unpredictable, bull elephant is rumbling and trumpeting and he's making lots of noise.

Marilyn feels very strongly that Communicating Across Boundaries should remain a politics-free zone. I understand that. Politics polarizes the public very quickly. Defenses go up, weapon-words are sharpened and launched and then people run for their corner. It's virtually impossible, it seems, to have a calm conversation about these things. I suppose I shouldn't expect anything different. We're not merely musing over a distant theoretical system, we're voicing values and convictions. Politics, on the level that matters, is deeply personal. It's essentially about educating our children, keeping everyone healthy and safe, living peaceably within our communities, protecting the vulnerable, paving our streets, mending our bridges.

Last weekend our son, Connor, called from Canada. During the conversation, I made some comment related to the state of the Union and he balked, "I don't want to talk about politics," he said. I suspect my response was rather quick and a tad bit harsh, "I understand that. But you live in a different country where you have the privilege of breathing different air. Here it's everywhere, it's a part of every conversation, it's the elephant in every room, it's the air we breath! I'm afraid we no longer have that luxury-!"

Many of you know that I'm a Spiritual Director. When a Spiritual Director encounters elephants in the room he or she is trained to look past the elephant to the heart of the matter-to your heart which matters. We might name the elephant but we might not. What really is of critical importance is what's being stirred up in you because of the elephant. A Spiritual Director helps you explore how you feel about the elephant, what uncomfortable places you're avoiding and why, what it might look like to press into those places. A Spiritual Director is curious about your soul, about your responses to the world around you, about the ways you are encountering God.

It's time to attend to our souls. There are activists among us who are resisting the elephant's movement. There are fact checkers and ethics committee members that are scrutinizing the elephant's loud bellows. Courts in the land, run by judges committed to "swear to tell the truth, and nothing but the truth," are holding the elephant and his trainers to justice. But it's our own responsibility to take care of our hearts.

How are you holding up? What emotions are surfacing in you? How are you dealing with those feelings? Can you recognize and name what's happening inside you? Are there places of panic or fear or dis-ease welling up? Can you find the courage to step closer to Jesus with your troubled spirit? Do you know, has it been your experience, that you are deeply loved? Are there ways that you are trying to protect yourself from pain? Are you struggling to love your neighbor as you've struggled to love yourself? Are you isolating yourself? Do you need to seek out someone to help you hold steady to the soul work that's ongoing in you? Are you being called to something beyond your soul's borders? Can you identify what Jesus might be inviting you into? Is there something inside you preventing you from engaging?

This is a strange season. These are troubling times. The elephant is on the move and there's a great deal of dust in the air. Can you take some time to tend to your own soul in the midst of the turmoil? Can you take a break from the resistance you might be involved in to ensure you're not resisting your own center? Can you push pause on activity and contemplate your deeper core? You might not be able to tell the elephant, as Lowell told the dog Pickles, to lie down, but maybe you can leave the room for just a little while. Give your soul a Sabbath from the messy elephant tromped up space. Take some deep breaths. And attend to your soul.

(*Photo credit: edie.net)


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