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Maggie Reviews The Forever Sea by Joshua Phillip Johnson

Posted on the 21 June 2021 by Lesbrary @lesbrary
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The Forever Sea by Joshua Phillip Johnson is a very interesting new fantasy book that features pirates, the high seas, magical fires, girlfriends, exciting world-building, and pitched battles-over a lack of water. The seas the characters sail over, fight on, and struggle with are grass, not water, and the ships sail over them through the use of magical hearth fires that keep the ships from plunging into the deeps. Kindred, a novice hearth fire tender, is struggling to find her place with her first crew after she departed from her grandmother's ship to make her own way. But Kindred learned her way around the sea and a hearth fire from her grandmother, and her unorthodox ways and interests clash against the more utilitarian crew she signs up with. Returning from a voyage to learn about her grandmother's death destabilizes her even more. But back-stabbing politicians, pirates, and conflict with her own crew doesn't leave her much time to search for answers, and Kindred is torn between the life she should want to protect and the answers calling to her from the hearth fires and the depths of the grass sea.

The real pull of this book is the fascinating conceit-an endless grass sea-and the world built up around it. Personally, at times I would wish for fewer action sequences and more details about how the sea even works. There's the grasses themselves, flowers, creatures, natural phenomena like fires, and, perhaps, unnatural phenomenon. The hearth fires too are fascinating-they could almost be another set of characters, with how they control the environment on the ships. From dew harvesting to floating cities to the creatures of the deep, the world of The Forever Sea is intriguing and noteworthy. If you like either pirate books or fascinating other worlds, this is a good combination for you. The feel is very nautical but also very uncanny. It's a rich setting, and I can't wait to see more of it.

I also appreciated Kindred's almost schoolgirl-esque crush on a fellow crewmate-Ragged Sarah. Sarah, the crew lookout and bird caller, has a hidden past, but she's sweet and she likes Kindred. In an otherwise uncanny and action-filled book, the sweetness of their feelings for each other is a nice contrast, and it gives Kindred something good to balance out all the difficult decisions that they face. The romance isn't the main story of the book, but it's nonetheless an important part of the events, and I found myself rooting for them to not be torn apart in difficult circumstances.

There's been a lot of amazing queer science fiction and fantasy come out over the past couple of years, and since the romance isn't this main focus of the plot, this one didn't make a lot of the queer SF/F lists, but I think it's a worthwhile addition to a to-read list. Interesting world-building is something I learned to value even more after my environment narrowed to my apartment last year, and sailing The Forever Sea is a good way to while away a few afternoons.


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