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George W. Bush: ‘White Supremacy in Any Form is Blasphemy Against the American Creed’

Posted on the 20 October 2017 by Sumithardia

George W. Bush: ‘White supremacy in any form is blasphemy against the American creed’

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I can easily separate “George W. Bush, the terrible president” and “George W. Bush, the retired ex-POTUS, painter and a seemingly rare Republican of conscience in 2017.” I’m not saying I want Dubya to be president again (I do not), but I am saying that Dubya looks so much better now that we’re dealing with monstrosity known as Donald Trump. Bush did terrible things, but he never blatantly sided with white supremacists, nor did he bully people on Twitter. Another thing I’ve come to respect about Bush: he liked Obama, and he has never publicly criticized Obama. But Bush has said many critical things about Donald Trump in the past year, and I truly believe that many in the Bush family refused to vote for Trump. So, yeah: Bush’s legacy as a president is tarnished and awful, but hey, at least he’s not a f–king deplorable Trump voter.
Well, on Thursday, Dubya spoke at the George W. Bush Institute event for “The Spirit of Liberty: At Home, In The World.” I really hope everyone takes the time to listen to the entire speech because OMG, I actually felt some pangs. George W. Bush made such a powerful speech decrying Donald Trump without even mentioning Trump by name.

He denounces “bigotry in any form” and condemns “bullying and prejudice in our public life.” He uses the word “tyranny” and it feels like he’s talking about Tyrant Trump. He hits Trump for spreading dangerous conspiracy theories and for being a blatant liar. He talks movingly about the American project, about free trade, about the dangers of an increasingly cruel society. Here’s a portion:
Freedom is not merely a political menu option, or a foreign policy fad; it should be the defining commitment of our country, and the hope of the world. That appeal is proved not just by the content of people’s hopes, but a noteworthy hypocrisy: No democracy pretends to be a tyranny. Most tyrannies pretend they are democracies. Democracy remains the definition of political legitimacy. That has not changed, and that will not change.
…We have seen our discourse degraded by casual cruelty. At times, it can seem like the forces pulling us apart are stronger than the forces binding us together. Argument turns too easily into animosity. Disagreement escalates into dehumanization. Too often, we judge other groups by their worst examples while judging ourselves by our best intentions – forgetting the image of God we should see in each other.
We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism – forgotten the dynamism that immigration has always brought to America. We see a fading confidence in the value of free markets and international trade – forgetting that conflict, instability, and poverty follow in the wake of protectionism. We have seen the return of isolationist sentiments – forgetting that American security is directly threatened by the chaos and despair of distant places, where threats such as terrorism, infectious disease, criminal gangs and drug trafficking tend to emerge.
…Our identity as a nation – unlike many other nations – is not determined by geography or ethnicity, by soil or blood. Being an American involves the embrace of high ideals and civic responsibility. We become the heirs of Thomas Jefferson by accepting the ideal of human dignity found in the Declaration of Independence. We become the heirs of James Madison by understanding the genius and values of the U.S. Constitution. We become the heirs of Martin Luther King, Jr., by recognizing one another not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. This means that people of every race, religion, and ethnicity can be fully and equally American. It means that bigotry or white supremacy in any form is blasphemy against the American creed.
[Transcript from Politico]
As many have pointed out, Bush never came out and said any of this in the eight years of Obama’s presidency. Was that merely because, man-to-man, Bush liked Obama? Or was it because Bush genuinely thought Obama was a good president, a president who was not hellbent on destroying the country from within? It’s fascinating to see Bush take on this role of elder statesman and party statesman at this point, and it’s even stranger that I find myself looking at Dubya with such fondness now. Yeah… Bush did a good speech.
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Photos courtesy of Getty.

Source: George W. Bush: ‘White supremacy in any form is blasphemy against the American creed’

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