Society Magazine

BOOK REVIEW: The Collected Schizophrenias by Esmé Weijun Wang

By Berniegourley @berniegourley

The Collected Schizophrenias: Essays by Esmé Weijun Wang
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

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Schizophrenia is ill-understood, and that's just by psychiatrists and psychologists, the rest of us tend to downright misunderstand the condition. Wang's book collects thirteen essays on her experience of living with schizo-affective disorder. I found Wang's prose to be clever and engaging, though she does get into the weeds of technicality a bit in some of the early chapters. The book is not only well-written, it's also brutally forthright. We hear a lot of how the author uses her alma mater (Yale) as a combination of sword and shield to combat the ever-present assumption she will be a stark-raving - not to mention dangerous - lunatic.

The book begins with discussion of diagnosis, but it doesn't begin with her being diagnosed as Schizo-affective, but rather as Bipolar [formerly know as, manic-depressive.] There's a great deal of discussion of the inexactitude of psychiatric science, and the fact that - to be fair - it's not like every case is presents the same. The set of symptoms seen may create the potential to classify the same individual in different ways; hence, psychiatric diagnosis is often a long and winding road.

To list the essays with descriptions wouldn't do them justice, so, instead, I'll present some of the highlights. There're a couple of chapters that look at how Wang tried to cope with, or counteract, the impression of people finding out she had schizophrenia. One of these involved the aforementioned repeated references to the Ivy-league institution that ultimately kicked her out and wouldn't let her back in once she'd been treated and stabilized. Another was attachment to the label - and the idea - of "high-functioning," which can be a hard sell for a condition like Schizophrenia. (Though not uniquely so. I once had a conversation with friend who didn't understand that there could be such a thing as a "mild stroke." This person believed that if one had any stroke one would surely be unable to talk correctly or have adult cognitive functioning. Though it occurs to me that my analogy is not entirely apt because anyone with a diagnosis of Schizophrenia will at some point experience severe symptoms - e.g. hallucination, delusion, etc. - otherwise they would be unlikely to be [rightly or wrongly] so diagnosed.)

There's a chapter that deals with the question of having children. This brings up the twin questions of whether the schizophrenic can be a good parent throughout the development of the child, as well as how likely they are to pass on the trait through genes. [Those who've watched "A Beautiful Mind" will remember a scene in which the bathwater is rising on the baby because Nash is having an episode.]

Wang uses a number of sensationalist cases - e.g. murders - both to counteract the notion that all Schizophrenics are dangerous by contrasting with her own [more typical] experience, but also to let the reader know such extremes do exist. It should also be pointed out that one of these cases was the murder of a Schizophrenic by a family member who was living in terror that said schizophrenic (her brother) would ultimate kill her and her daughter, given the things he said and the auditory hallucinations he was said to have had.

One of the most interesting discussions for me was Wang's description of leaving the Scarlett Johansson film "Lucy" asking her boyfriend whether what she saw was real. Everybody has that situation of being drawn into a film in an edge-of-the-seat fashion, but is fascinating to imagine a person who can't disentangle from that state.

Chapter ten talks about the author's experience with Cotard's Syndrome. Cotard's is a condition in which the individual believes they are deceased. I've read of Cotard's in popular neuroscience books, but Wang's first-hand account provides an extra level of connection to it.

The last essay discusses Wang's pursuit of spirituality. It should be noted that in many tribal societies, Schizophrenics have been made shamans and are seen as having special powers. Wang doesn't talk about this in great detail though she does a little [it is the premise of the series "Undone" on Amazon Prime], but it's interesting to consider how religion and spirituality might influence the Schizophrenic mind.

I found this book fascinating and the writing to be elegant. I would highly recommend it for anyone with interests in the mind, mental illness, or just the experiences of other people.

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