Art & Design Magazine

Creativity and Chaos: The Power of Anarchy

By Simonbrushfield

This article has power.

It could improve your life dramatically.

By changing the way you think.

Because India has changed me.

Here we go…

Creating original art, there are times when order quickly turns to chaos.

When an imbalance occurs, anarchy reigns.

Chaos breaks out regularly when creating original art.

For an abstract artist, disorder is a familiar scenario.

In fact, since living in India, I have grown comfortable in confusion.

Point 1. Chaos is confusing, but it’s vital for creativity.

Simon Brushfields old Studio Creativity and Chaos: The Power of Anarchy

Simons art studio during 2007 in Sydney, Australia

The creative process is wildly unstable.

So is India.

Paint drips, colours smudge, paint splatters on walls, the floor, it gets in your hair and everything gets very messy.

In the middle of a painting, I often lose myself.

Chaos breaks out.

The direction of an original abstract painting is unpredictable.

So is living in India.

Point 2. Chaos is important because it instigates change.

And healthy change signals progress.

Like creating an original painting, we can lose direction very easily.

People become confused and overwhelmed.

Especially for foreigners in a crazy country.

Not knowing what to do next.

Crowded by mental or physical disorder.

Chaos.

Messy situations.

But from the wilderness, we eventually find a new and exciting direction.

Amidst an unpredictable mess, the best artists find an intriguing mystery.

A divine attraction.

Random beauty.

Point 3. Top original art promotes order arising from disorder.

An original painting follows a direction of its own.

Especially abstract art.

The artist is simply a facilitator.

1n 2004, the Sydney Opera House painting below, appeared from the chaos of a messy art studio.

Creativity travels through confusion into clarity.

Hopefully, achieving a perfect natural order.

A mysterious balance, where logic and rationality become largely irrelevant.

Beauty paramount.

Sydney Harbour Sunrise painting by Simon Brushfield 1024x963 Creativity and Chaos: The Power of Anarchy

“Sydney Harbour Sunrise” by Simon Brushfield (2004) Acrylic & Oil on canvas 1m x 1m (Sold: Private Acquisition)

Living in India feels entirely chaotic.

Sometimes lacking in meaning and purpose.

But a little creative thinking, some patience and playfulness – things can quickly turn around.

A beautiful picture forms amidst the anarchy.

Point 4. Chaos is a natural part of life.

Throughout the history of man, civilisations have endeavoured to control nature.

But nature finds its own unique way to exert authority.

Often by natural disasters.

Chaos erupts.

Flood. Volcano. Tsunami. Typhoon. Earthquake. Bushfire. They all create disorder.

Highlighting the fragility of human beings established order over the untamed elements of life.

Blue Abstract painting by Simon Brushfield1 1024x819 Creativity and Chaos: The Power of Anarchy

“Chaos” by Simon Brushfield (2001) Acrylic & Mixed media on canvas 1.4m x 1.8m (Sold: Private Acquisition)

Miracles are born from chaos.

New opportunities arise.

After severe bushfires in Australia, new plant life appears incredibly quickly.

New ways of thinking and creative expression are discovered amidst anarchy.

Rock’n’Roll is a perfect example.

Point 5. Innovation often arises from initial confusion and uncertainty.

Chaos theory is a mathematic principle discovered by Edward Lorenz in 1960.

In simple terms, it explains that complex unpredictable results will have powerful creative effects elsewhere.

A famous example is a butterfly flapping its wings in China, can effect weather patterns in New York.

Below is one example of chaos theory, in visual terms, using fractals.

It’s beautiful.

Nature’s original art.

web fractal BloggS74.com  1024x640 Creativity and Chaos: The Power of Anarchy

Fractals © creative commons image from BloggS74.com

The mathematical computations that create these fractal images are endless.

Point 6. Ironically, chaos is incredibly important to an orderly universe.

Fractals contain a chaotic mathematical complexity beyond what the human mind can conceive.

The fractal images above clearly illustrate one thing…

Within chaos, there also exists an infinitely beautiful unexplainable natural mathematic order.

Chaos is unavoidable.

We need to embrace uncertainty.

Particularly in a foreign country.

Because here’s the importance of the matter for artists…

Final Point. Chaos adds important depth & beauty to the creative process.

© Copyright Simon Brushfield – Creativity and Chaos: The Power of Anarchy

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